Rice calls Hamas ‘resistance movement’ during unscripted remarks

From our Why We’re In The Fix We’re In Department: “Oops, she did it again! Rice calls Hamas ‘resistance movement’ during unscripted remarks,” by Aaron Klein for WorldNetDaily:

JERUSALEM — For at least the fourth time in recent months, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice referred to the Hamas terrorist organization as a “resistance” movement during unscripted remarks with reporters, WND has learned.

This time, Rice was giving a free-ranging interview two weeks ago with the Washington Times when a reporter asked her about the wisdom of encouraging democracy in countries where radical Islamists could win elections, pointing as an example to Hamas, which won Palestinian elections two years ago.

Rice replied: “It’s, I would say, still a story-in-progress on Hamas, in particular, because I think there’s plenty of evidence now that one reason that Hamas went back to their bad old ways and took over the Gaza and overthrew the legitimate Palestinian Authority institutions is that actually they were failing at governance, and it’s easier to be a resistance movement than to be a governing movement.”

Her remarks are transcribed in full on the State Department website….

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Comments

  1. says

    I disagree, Champ.

    Rice should be immediately dismissed from all government service

    But before she goes, one final act: REVOKE Jimmy the Dhimmi’s passport!

  2. says

    Rice should be immediately dismissed from all government service

    But before she goes, one final act: REVOKE Jimmy the Dhimmi’s passport!

    Posted by: boneshack

    I agree! Hopefully our next administration will see fit to can Rice; and you’re being too kind to suggest that Jimmy’s passport be revoked. Hope he’s a good swimmer, because I think he should be asked to leave his passport behind and swim the Atlantic in pursuit of his new ‘friends’. OK – he can wear a life jacket (now I’m being too kind).

  3. says

    “I have a question. Many say that there is no “Palestine.” So, what is it, then?

    Posted by: darcy ”

    a restive Jordanian suburb…

  4. says

    “I have a question. Many say that there is no “Palestine.” So, what is it, then?

    Posted by: darcy ”

    a restive Jordanian suburb…

    Posted by: pulsar182 at April 16, 2008 5:54 PM

    OK, so why do they use the name “Palestine?”
    And “Palestinians” to define themselves?

  5. says

    Here’s another inspiring story about Condi’s accomplishments in bringing the outrageously unthinkable into our thoughts. Condi’s protege’s in Kossovo, Muslim Albanian nationalists whose “independence” she energetically sponsored, have been accused of crimes worse than ghoulish.

    Robert and JW seem to have so far missed an important story about some of the Muslim political leaders who benefit from the solicitous care and concern of Western politicians and the Western humanitarian machine. The leaders of the newly self-declared “independent” Kossovo have been accused of running a body parts racket by none other than Carla del Ponte, chief prosecutor of the Hague Tribunal on war crimes in the former Yugoslavia. Condi Rice very vigorously promoted Kossovo independence against Serbia, despite everything done against the Serbian civilian population there. Condi was very active on the Kossovo issue, as she still is in trying to build up a Muslim/Arab fanatic state to threaten Israel in the Land of Israel. See link for info on the body parts snatchers favored by Condi. Maybe Robert can comment on the Islamic meaning of taking infidels’ body parts.

    http://ziontruth.blogspot.com/2008/04/condoleezza-rice-embraces-anti-israel.html

  6. says

    “OK, so why do they use the name “Palestine?”
    And “Palestinians” to define themselves?

    Posted by: darcy ”

    “FACT
    The term “Palestine” is believed to be derived from the Philistines, an Aegean people who, in the 12th Century B.C.E., settled along the Mediterranean coastal plain of what are now Israel and the Gaza Strip. In the second century C.E., after crushing the last Jewish revolt, the Romans first applied the name Palaestina to Judea (the southern portion of what is now called the West Bank) in an attempt to minimize Jewish identification with the land of Israel. The Arabic word “Filastin” is derived from this Latin name.3

    The Hebrews entered the Land of Israel about 1300 B.C.E., living under a tribal confederation until being united under the first monarch, King Saul. The second king, David, established Jerusalem as the capital around 1000 B.C.E. David’s son, Solomon built the Temple soon thereafter and consolidated the military, administrative and religious functions of the kingdom. The nation was divided under Solomon’s son, with the northern kingdom (Israel) lasting until 722 B.C.E., when the Assyrians destroyed it, and the southern kingdom (Judah) surviving until the Babylonian conquest in 586 B.C.E. The Jewish people enjoyed brief periods of sovereignty afterward before most Jews were finally driven from their homeland in 135 C.E.

    Jewish independence in the Land of Israel lasted for more than 400 years. This is much longer than Americans have enjoyed independence in what has become known as the United States.4 In fact, if not for foreign conquerors, Israel would be 3,000 years old today.

    Palestine was never an exclusively Arab country, although Arabic gradually became the language of most the population after the Muslim invasions of the seventh century. No independent Arab or Palestinian state ever existed in Palestine. When the distinguished Arab-American historian, Princeton University Prof. Philip Hitti, testified against partition before the Anglo-American Committee in 1946, he said: “There is no such thing as ‘Palestine’ in history, absolutely not.”5

    Prior to partition, Palestinian Arabs did not view themselves as having a separate identity. When the First Congress of Muslim-Christian Associations met in Jerusalem in February 1919 to choose Palestinian representatives for the Paris Peace Conference, the following resolution was adopted:

    We consider Palestine as part of Arab Syria, as it has never been separated from it at any time. We are connected with it by national, religious, linguistic, natural, economic and geographical bonds.6

    In 1937, a local Arab leader, Auni Bey Abdul-Hadi, told the Peel Commission, which ultimately suggested the partition of Palestine: “There is no such country [as Palestine]! ‘Palestine’ is a term the Zionists invented! There is no Palestine in the Bible. Our country was for centuries part of Syria.”7

    The representative of the Arab Higher Committee to the United Nations submitted a statement to the General Assembly in May 1947 that said “Palestine was part of the Province of Syria” and that, “politically, the Arabs of Palestine were not independent in the sense of forming a separate political entity.” A few years later, Ahmed Shuqeiri, later the chairman of the PLO, told the Security Council: “It is common knowledge that Palestine is nothing but southern Syria.”8

    Palestinian Arab nationalism is largely a post-World War I phenomenon that did not become a significant political movement until after the 1967 Six-Day War and Israel’s capture of the West Bank.”

  7. says

    Whoa, thanks for all of that info, pulsar. I appreciate it.

    “It is common knowledge that Palestine is nothing but southern Syria.”8

    Southern Syria it is!

  8. says

    I’ve had a resistance to Rice since her embarrassing apologistics during the phony “koran flushing at Gitmo” event where she was overcome with dhimmitude when she kept saying “The Holy Koran” this and “The Holy Koran” that.

    She’s a “Soviet scholar”.

    Which means she has no qualifications for her current position.

    Another bad Bush choice.

    Continuing to make a public spectacle of her ignorance.

  9. says

    I don’t see what the fuss is. The fact that something is regarded as a resistance movement doesn’t make their actions any more or less justified. The ‘Palestinians’ may have legitimate grievances but their own way of responding to those grievances is simply criminal. I do have a small amount of pity for the people, but I also think those people must learn to take responsibility for their actions.

    They simply haven’t been willing to do that.

  10. says

    In addition to what pulsar182 said, when looking at video archives or newspapers before the modern state of Israel was formed in 1948. You will find the terms “Jews of Palestine” and “Arabs of Palestine” used in English media, but not the term “Palestinian”.

  11. says

    Good evening, all my fellow Islamorealists!

    What Pulsar182 posted above was a brilliant summary of the “Palestinian” question.

    For a really detailed analysis, I again present this most excellent source.

    Please click the *.pdf file, download it, and READ it again and again until you have it memorized! Our esteemed David Horowitz has it right:

    Big Lies

    Each and every time you encounter some idiot zombie apologist, you will be very well armed!

  12. says

    one reason that Hamas went back to their bad old ways and took over the Gaza and overthrew the legitimate Palestinian Authority institutions is that actually they were failing at governance, and it’s easier to be a resistance movement than to be a governing movement.”
    ……………………..

    Does anyone remember–it wasn’t very long ago–the “pothole theory” of governance re the Gazan election of Hamas? The idea went that Hamas, extremists though they were, would supposedly be too caught up in the business of “fixing potholes”–that is, the everyday nuts and bolts of governing a state–to wage war on their neighbor.

    Well, I guess, according to Ms. Rice, that building a democratic state, and a thriving economy, and even fixing potholes, was too hard and not nearly as much fun as shelling Sderot, viciously kneecapping their Fatah rivals, and burning down Christian bookstores.

    The idea that they were elected, certainly by the majority of Gazans, for this very purpose, does not seem to have occured to most people.