On Christmas Day, Iran re-arrests Christian pastor who converted from Islam

Muhammad said: “Whoever changed his Islamic religion, then kill him” (Bukhari 9.84.57). The death penalty for apostasy is part of Islamic law according to all the schools of Islamic jurisprudence. Yet Muslim spokesmen such as Harris Zafar, Mustafa Akyol, Salam al-Marayati, M. Cherif Bassiouni, and Ali Eteraz (among many others) have assured us that Islam doesn’t punish apostasy. I expect that Zafar, Akyol, al-Marayati, Bassiouni, and Eteraz will immediately be jetting over to Rasht to explain to the authorities of the Islamic Republic that they are getting Islam all wrong, wrong, wrong.

“Iran re-arrests Pastor Nadarkhani on Christmas Day,” by Lisa Daftari for FoxNews.com, December 26 (thanks to Kenneth):

The Iranian Christian pastor who had been imprisoned in Iran for converting from Islam to Christianity was taken into custody again on Christmas Day, according to several Iranian media sources and individuals close to the pastor and his family.

Youcef Nadarkhani, 35, had been summoned to return back to Lakan Prison in Rasht, the facility where he served time and was then released, based on the charge that he must complete the remainder of his sentence, according to several reports and confirmed by those close to Nadarkhani in Iran.

In September, the pastor was acquitted of apostasy, but the court maintained his three-year sentence for evangelizing Muslims. As he had already served close to three years, the pastor was freed after posting bail.

The court had then stated that the remainder which equaled roughly 45 days, would be served in the form of probation.

Nadarkhani, married and father of two young children, came under the regime’s radar in 2006 when he applied for his church to be registered with the state. According to sources, he was arrested at that time and then soon released.

In 2009, Nadarkhani went to local officials to complain about Islamic indoctrination in his school district, arguing that his children should not be forced to learn about Islam.

He was subsequently arrested.

Since Nadarkhani’s release in September, his attorney, Mohammed Ali Dadkhah has been imprisoned and remains in Iran’s notoriously brutal Evin Prison where his health is rapidly deteriorating and is being denied proper dental care, according to his family. He has been incarcerated for advocating Nadarkhani’s case and other human rights cases….

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Comments

  1. says

    Death for Apostasy (4:89, Bukhari)

    Allah, Q. 4:89 “…But if they turn renegades (“reject faith”, leave Islam),
    seize them and SLAY them wherever ye find them”

  2. says

    The Islamic goverment rules of Iran have again shown that they must be very much afraid of the people hearing other worldviews and to be more specific they are scared of the people hearing the teachings of the Bible. They have proven this be re-arresting that Christian pastor. The mullahs and other Islamic rulers in power must fear that if the Iranian people hear the Bible teaching they might start to compair and contrast both the Quran and the Bible. In doing so they might find out that the Bible is the superior of the two books. If this happens than that mullahs would lose the power base which is Islam which has its foundtion in the Quran. Islam is likewise the fountaion on which the current regime of Iran rest on. So the mullahs and Ayatollah Khamenie will do everthing to can, this includes in re-arresting of the Christian pastor,to keep the people of Iran away fron the light of Christianity and to keep them in the darkness of Islam. The Islamic rules do this because they want to remain in power. So they expose by their own actions that they fear the truth and power of the Bible.

  3. says

    This is sickening, and is typical of the cat and mouse cruelty of mohammedans.

    How much they must have enjoyed doing it on *Christmas Day**.

    ”Since Nadarkhani’s release in September, his attorney, Mohammed Ali Dadkhah has been imprisoned and remains in Iran’s notoriously brutal Evin Prison where his health is rapidly deteriorating and is being denied proper dental care, according to his family. He has been incarcerated for advocating Nadarkhani’s case and other human rights cases….”

    And *this* poor man, also. They free the Pastor in September, but imprison his *lawyer* for defending him. Utterly insane, and evil. How I loathe them all, and their foul cult.

  4. says

    “Iran re-arrests Pastor Nadarkhani on Christmas Day”
    ………………………

    I’d been worried about Pastor Nadarkhani even though he had been released from prison”I had hoped that he and his family would be able to get out of Iran.

    I was concerned that he would be targeted for violence by the pious Ummah, but I suppose the vile Iranian state hadn’t finished with him yet either.

    God, I hate Islam.

  5. says

    Actually, that’s not correct.

    The Khmer Rouge killed a vast number of people – they *also* killed most of the Christians, though the church has rebounded since – but they didn’t kill all the Muslims.

    The 2010 edition of my Christian sourcebook, ‘Operation World’, which is a guide to praying for the nations, states in its chapter on Cambodia that the Muslim population of Cambodia, at the time of publication, was guesstimated at 2.3 % of the population, some 346,000 people, mostly of the Cham ethnic group; and increasing. (Though you’ll be pleased to know that there are more Christians than Muslims in Cambodia, and the growth rate of the Christians, in Cambodia, is a good deal faster than that of the Muslims).