Traitorous Johnny Taliban wins suit to pray daily with other Muslim inmates

The outcome of this suit was a foregone conclusion in today’s politically correct age, in which non-Muslim laws, customs and practices must always give way to Muslim ones, no matter the concerns for safety or anything else. It is noteworthy, however, that Lindh is being allowed to reinforce in himself and other inmates the same ideology and belief system that led him to travel to Afghanistan and take up arms against U.S. soldiers in the first place.

“US-born Taliban fighter wins prison prayer lawsuit,” by Charles Wilson for the Associated Press, January 11 (thanks to Block Ness):

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) – An American convicted of fighting alongside the Taliban must be allowed to pray daily in a group with other Muslim inmates at his high-security prison in Indiana, a federal judge ruled Friday.

Barring John Walker Lindh and his fellow Muslims from engaging in daily group ritual prayer violates a 1993 law that bans the government from curtailing religious speech without showing a compelling interest, U.S. District Judge Jane Magnus-Stinson ruled.

The judge blocked the prison from enforcing its ban on daily group prayer, but she noted that her ruling does not prohibit the prison from taking less restrictive security measures.

U.S. Attorney Joe Hogsett, whose office represented the prison, said Friday that prosecutors were considering their next step, including a possible appeal.

“This case deals with critically important issues that have significance both inside and outside the walls of our federal prison facilities,” Hogsett said. “Our concern continues to be the safety and security of both our federal prison system and the United States of America.”

Ken Falk, legal director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana, which represented Lindh, noted Friday that witnesses testified prisoners were allowed for many years to pray daily outside their cells, “and it never caused any problem.”

“I think the court correctly noted that security is a primary concern, but that it’s not sufficient for the government to claim a security concern without having evidence of it,” Falk said.

Group prayers had been allowed once a week and on high holy days such as Ramadan or Christmas in the prison unit where Lindh was housed, the Communications Management Unit in Terre Haute, Ind. But at other times, inmates had to pray alone in their cells.

Lindh said that didn’t meet the Quran’s requirements, and that the Hanbali school of Islam to which he adheres requires him to pray daily with other Muslims.

But prison officials said the same restrictions applied to all inmates, and that meeting Lindh’s demands would be dangerous, unaffordable and unfair. Government witnesses testified that Muslims, who make up the majority of inmates in the unit, have operated like a gang under the guise of religious activity.

During trial, the ACLU noted that games and some other group activities were not restricted.

Lindh is serving a 20-year sentence for aiding the Taliban during the 2001 U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan. He was captured by U.S. troops that year, and in 2002 pleaded guilty to supplying services and carrying explosives for the now-defunct Taliban government. He is eligible for release in 2019.

Raised Catholic, the California native was 12 when he saw the movie “Malcolm X” and became interested in Islam. He converted at age 16. Walker told Newsweek after his capture that he had entered Afghanistan to help the Taliban build a “pure Islamic state.”…

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Comments

  1. says

    Group invocation of evil is more powerful than channeling Allah’s evil alone…It’s based on the old saying, ‘misery loves company’…
    Allah love misery more than almost anything…
    Group misery is one of his favorites…So if miserable Mahoundians want to share their miserable religion with each other in prison…fine…They deserve all the misery Allah can afflict on them…

  2. says

    As long as Islam is regarded and treated as/like a religion, I’m afraid we’ll continue to see these sort of things.

    “Raised Catholic, the California native was 12 when
    he saw the movie “Malcolm X” and became
    interested in Islam.”

    This is quite funny,

    I was born and raised a Roman Catholic, (I still am) I too saw the movie of Malcom X when I was 12, but I didn’t nor do I have any interest in islam whatsoever (then or now)

    OT: Mr Spencer, I saw your exchange with @deanofcomedy on twitter, it was quite entertaining. Sarc off
    Who was that @ZaydforNYC ? I checked out his profile and its like he’s a palestinian running for mayor in New York. You should have told him he’s type aren’t welcome in the US since his brothers and co-religionists were celebrating on their rooftops in Gaza on 9/11. I hope you and Ms Geller frustrate his effort, all they wanna do is build a mosque at ground zero.
    Keep up the good work Mr Spencer Godspeed

  3. says

    As long as Islam is regarded and treated as/like a religion, I’m afraid we’ll continue to see these sort of things.

    “Raised Catholic, the California native was 12 when
    he saw the movie “Malcolm X” and became
    interested in Islam.”

    This is quite funny,

    I was born and raised a Roman Catholic, (I still am) I too saw the movie of Malcom X when I was 12, but I didn’t nor do I have any interest in islam whatsoever (then or now)

    OT: Mr Spencer, I saw your exchange with @deanofcomedy on twitter, it was quite entertaining. Sarc off
    Who was that @ZaydforNYC ? I checked out his profile and its like he’s a palestinian running for mayor in New York. You should have told him he’s type aren’t welcome in the US since his brothers and co-religionists were celebrating on their rooftops in Gaza on 9/11. I hope you and Ms Geller frustrate his effort, all they wanna do is build a mosque at ground zero.
    Keep up the good work Mr Spencer

  4. says

    If I were the judge I would have said “Fine, you want to pray with your fellow muslim inmates, you can do that.” And then order the prison warden to stuff every muslim inmate in the prison into his cell for every prayer of the day.

    But that’s just me.

  5. says

    “……the Hanbali school of Islam to which he adheres requires him to pray daily with other Muslims….”

    This school. That sect. Sufis. Sunnis. Shias. Ahmadiyyas. Different strokes for different folks. Is it just me, or do muslims make up the rules as they go along?

    This traitorous little creep should be hanged.

  6. says

    Among the sharpest criticisms of Islamic ideology is its failure of to legally permit freedom of religion, freedom of conscience, and freedom of speech. RS regularly writes about the threat to these freedoms, especially the threat to freedom of speech by the OIC, which seeks to impose sharia law limits on speech considered critical of ideas like religious ideas.

    The Lindh case was a fairly simply one which sought to allow Muslims to practice their religion withot unreasonable restraints by the fed governement. Rather than criticize this Lindh decision those who support the freedoms of speech, religion and conscience ought to support the outcome.

    The decision stands for the proposition that fed government restraints on the practice of one’s religion must not violate a 1998 federal law that prohibits unreasonable restraint on one’s right to practice his religion. The court ruled that the prison’s failure to allow Hanbali Muslims like Lindh to pray together was unreasonable.

    The right to practice one’s religion when the practice bumps up against government regulations has long been the subject of US Sup Ct first amendment jurisprudence.

    Wikipedia has a concise history of that jurisprudence and the 1993 Act. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Religious_Freedom_Restoration_Act

    Briefly, in the 1960s-1980s the US Sup Ct handed down several cases that were perceived by many across the entire political spectrum to unreasonably burden the rights of minorities to paractice their religion. Many groups came together. Both liberal (like the American Civil Liberties Union) and conservative groups (like the Traditional Values Coalition) as well as other groups such as the Christian Legal Society, the American Jewish Congress, and the National Association of Evangelicals joined forces to support RFRA, which would reinstate a more pro-religion version of the law. The 1993 act, the RFRA, which was Congress’s reaction to that movevent to reverse the antireligion trend of Sup Ct cases. It passed the House unanimously and the Senate 97 to 3 and was signed into law by U.S. President Bill Clinton.

    Aside to Kepha who infers that Malcom X was a economic leftist or socialist. Not true. Malcolm firmly believed in the color “green.” He encouraged blacks to engage in free enterprise as part of the American capitistic system. That you call him an ignoramus while having no accurate understanding of him speaks more about you than it does him.
    P.s. Protestants are stupid mindless jesus freaks.

  7. says

    I am Protestant, read the autobiography of Malcolm X when young, and walked away feeling that the guy was an out-and-out jerk and all-around ignoramus. He appealed to a generation of self-absorbed young Americans who’d been made to feel guilty for their country’s hard-earned prosperity by a passle of Leftist teachers rather than taught anything resembling real history. That there are streets named after Malcolm X in my country (even if they’re invariably in the most blighted, crime-ridden parts of town) and that he has become part of our modern American “canon” is a national disgrace.