FBI: Foreign government identified Boston jihadi Tamerlan Tsarnaev as a “follower of radical Islam”

That means, of course, that he believed in Islam’s doctrines of violence and supremacism.

The mainstream media is making much today of Tsarnaev’s being kicked out of the Islamic Society of Boston, but in reality it was only because he flew into a rage of the imam’s mention of an Infidel, Martin Luther King. He was let back in later; he wasn’t expelled.

“FBI: Boston suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev followed ‘radical Islam,'” by Andrew Tangel and Ashley Powers for the Los Angeles Times, April 20 (thanks to Andrew Bostom):

Deceased Boston Marathon bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev was identified by a foreign government as a “follower of radical Islam and a strong believer” whose personality had changed drastically in just a year, according to the FBI.

As investigators considered possible motives for Monday’s fatal bombings, U.S. authorities acknowledged that an unnamed government had contacted the FBI to say the 26-year-old ethnic Chechen “had changed drastically” since 2010 and was preparing to leave the United States “to join unspecified underground groups,” according to an official statement from the FBI.

U.S. officials have not named the foreign nation, but it is presumed to be Russia. Tsarnaev traveled there in 2012 and stayed for six months.

Tamerlan Tsarnaev and his brother, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 19, came to the U.S. from Russia about a decade ago as ethnic Chechen refugees and were granted asylum, law enforcement sources have said. Tamerlan, who was killed in a gun battle with police early Friday morning Boston time, was a legal permanent U.S. resident. Dzhokhar, who became a citizen Sept. 11, 2012, was captured after a Friday night shootout with police and remains hospitalized in serious condition. He has not yet been charged.

According to the FBI, the foreign government had requested information on the older brother, and the agency responded by checking U.S. government databases for information on “derogatory” telephone communications, online promotion of radical activity, associations with other persons of interest, travel history and plans, and education history. The FBI also interviewed the suspect and family members and found no terrorism activity, the agency said.

“The FBI requested but did not receive more specific or additional information from the foreign government,” the statement read.

The disclosure comes as some U.S. lawmakers are urging that the surviving suspect be treated as a foreign combatant, and not simply a criminal suspect.

Family members and acquaintances have painted starkly contrasting portraits of the suspects. Classmates and others have described the younger brother as pleasant, but the older brother as intense and given to occasional outbursts.

At the Cambridge mosque near where the bombing suspects lived, two worshipers who showed up for Saturday”s prayer service recalled seeing both men.

Tamerlan Tsarnaev was thrown out of the mosque — the Islamic Society of Boston Cultural Center — about three months ago, after he stood up and shouted at the imam during a Friday prayer service, they said. The imam had held up slain civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. as an example of a man to emulate, recalled one worshiper who would give his name only as Muhammad.

Enraged, Tamerlan stood up and began shouting, Muhammad said.

You cannot mention this guy because he’s not a Muslim!” Muhammad recalled Tamerlan shouting, shocking others in attendance.

“He’s crazy to me,” Muhammad said. “He had an anger inside.”¦ I can’t explain what was in his mind.”

Tamerlan was then kicked out of the prayer service for his outburst, Muhammad recalled. “You can’t do that,” Muhammad said of shouting at the imam.

Still, Tamerlan returned to Friday prayer services and had no further outbursts, Muhammad said.

The other mosque attendee, who identified himself only as Haithen, described Dzhokhar Tsarnaev as nice, friendly and “really laid back.”

Tamerlan Tsarnaev was different though. “His persona was not really so nice,” this worshiper said.

An official statement released by the Islamic Society on Saturday said that while the suspects were known to mosque members, no one was able to predict or prevent the acts the brothers have been accused of.

Grief for the victims and their families and prayers for the recovery of the injured will be the continued focus of the center, the statement said. The center also pledged to leave “no stone uncovered in finding any other suspects connected to the bombs.”…

Troy Aiguier, owner of Troy’s Barber Shop in Cambridge, stood just a few blocks from the brothers’ Norfolk Street apartment. He said he had “watched them grow up on the same street” for roughly 10 years.

“It wasn’t like they stuck out like a sore thumb or anything. They were a totally average family,” he said.

Aiguier said he knew Tamerlan as a regular customer — the cut he’d get was “neat and clean” — and as a boxer in Lowell. “Pretty good,” was Aiguier’s assessment.

But Mary Silberman, who lives directly behind the brothers’ building, had a less positive impression of her neighbors. “It’s such a strange household,” she said.

Silberman’s bedroom window was at nearly the same level as the Tsarnaevs’ third-floor unit. She often heard the family during the summer when windows were left open.

“At odd hours, you’d hear screaming,” she said, saying the fights would occur close to midnight or in the early morning hours.

“It wasn’t enough to call the cops,” Silberman said. “With domestic affairs, it’s such a fine line. It’s not like I’d hear anything thrashing or hear anyone being punched.”

But even if the fights weren’t violent, they were loud, punctuated by a female voice yelling and a baby wailing….

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Comments

  1. says

    Intelligence communities in the US need to read the jihadist literature and understand the doctrines starting with ‘Milestones’ by Sayyid Qutb, ‘Jihad in Islam’ by Sayeed Abdul A’la Maududi and ‘The Neglecty Duty’ by Abd al-Salam Faraj.

    Intelligence will be useless without a solid understanding of the meaning of jihad. Jihad is not flower arrangement!

    Obama needs to rescind previous requirements to keep intel people in the dark about Islam’s central doctrine.

  2. says

    “FBI: Boston suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev followed ‘radical Islam,'”

    Shhh FBI, you are not supposed to know what that is…Are you trying give Islam a bad name?

  3. says

    Martin Luther King is respected in the African American community. The African American reverts within the Roxbury mosque community witnessing this outburst experienced quite a rude awakening to the reality of their reduced status to “abeed al-beit,” among the melanin-deprived believers.

  4. says

    I think the word “intelligence” before community needs to go into permanent quotes …until someone within it wakes the BLEEP up about the core tenets of expansionistic, imperialistic, totalitarian Islam.

  5. says

    “You cannot mention this guy because he’s not a Muslim!” Muhammad recalled Tamerlan shouting, shocking others in attendance.

    and he was Christian who preached peace…which is UN-Islamic….

  6. says

    “At odd hours, you’d hear screaming,” she said, saying the fights would occur close to midnight or in the early morning hours.

    he probably was only beating her lightly…

  7. says

    Quite arguably the most deceptive, destructive and counter-productive of all terms in this goofy world in which we live is the term “radical Islam.”

    The term “radical Islam” is massively redundant and thus perpetuates the enormous error that there is a good Islam lurking out there somewhere. There isn’t. A passive Islam practiced by clueless, confused, so-called moderate Muslims, i.e., lazy Muslims, yes. But a good Islam? Hell no.

    Conclusion: As long as the term “radical Islam” hangs around, to the extent that it does, then generally to that extent does the non-Muslim world still function in the dark.

  8. says

    Silberman’s bedroom window was at nearly the same level as the Tsarnaevs’ third-floor unit. She often heard the family during the summer when windows were left open.

    “At odd hours, you’d hear screaming,” she said, saying the fights would occur close to midnight or in the early morning hours.

    But even if the fights weren’t violent, they were loud, punctuated by a female voice yelling and a baby wailing….

    Just another typical day in the Middle East.

  9. says

    “I’m a moderate Christian. Wait till I get radicalized ;-)”

    I love that one, John! Yeah radical Christians demonstrate extreme love and prayers; perhaps hugging others to death! Oh no, run for cover!! …lol 😀

  10. says

    Agreed 100%. One thing to add: if we continue to give stupid names to EVIL. We will cease to exist. Soon.

  11. says

    “Just another typical day in the Middle East..”

    ???

    These guys were from the – Islamised-by-Jihad – Caucasus.

    Just another day in the dar al Islam.

    Or – all in a days – or a night’s – work for the Ummah, the Mohammedan Mob: whether black, white or brindle.

  12. says

    So, it appears, you see only a difference of *degree*, not *kind*, between any ‘third world’/ Non-Western country or ethnic group that is Muslim, and any ‘third world’ country or ethnic group that is *not* Muslim?

    Ayaan Hirsi Ali did not find it so.

    She found, as a child, a dramatic difference in atmosphere between Saudi Arabia – filthy rich, but suffused with Islam, and fundamentally *cruel* – and majority-Christian (and, indeed, influenced by Christianity for over a thousand years) Ethiopia, which was dirt poor, recovering from a disastrous Muslim-friendly Marxist regime (and who invented Marxism? NOT the ‘Third World!’), yet where the teachers in the school she attended and the random strangers she met in the street tended to be *kind*.

    In one country, as a little girl, she was suffocatingly confined and restricted; in the other, she was *free*.

    In one, she was thrashed by her schoolteacher and cursed as abeed, blackslave; in the other, not.